Daylight Saving Time Extension Was Part Of Energy, Tax Package: Was It Worth It? – Forbes

If it feels like Daylight Savings Time (DST) was creeping up on you again this year, you’re right. Daylight Saving Time has been making an appearance earlier in the year over the past decade – but it’s a trend that we’ve been seeing for the last fifty years.

Prior to 1966, laws setting dates for Daylight Saving Time were somewhat fluid. The United States adopted an official DST during World War I but the unpopular law was removed soon afterwards. It continued to be observed sporadically in some states until World War II, when President Franklin D. Roosevelt again signed temporary DST into law. As before, the unpopular law didn’t continue after the war.

That all changed in 1966, when President Lyndon Johnson signed a bill into law calling for Daylight Saving Time to begin on the last Sunday of April and end on the last Sunday of October each year. The dates were tweaked again, twenty years later, under Ronald Reagan who amended DST to begin at 2 a.m. on the first Sunday of April and end at 2 a.m. on the last Sunday of October. Just about twenty years later (notice a trend?), President Bush signed into law a new energy policy…

read more via Daylight Saving Time Extension Was Part Of Energy, Tax Package: Was It Worth It? – Forbes.

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